INTERVIEWS

01

interviews

11:56

"It’s a Picture Telling a Story" | Charlie Roberts

“I didn't grow up with abstract or conceptual art or anything like that. So, like for me, the root is really about storytelling.” American artist Charlie Roberts is known for his intimate figurative paintings, which depict the complexities and nuances of modern life in bright colors and intricate detail. To Roberts, painting is, first and foremost, narrative. Growing up in a small town in Kansas, Roberts recalls a mural in the local post office depicting workers in the fields. Discussing the evolution of figurative painting, Roberts notes its recent shift from nostalgia to contemporary relevance. He draws inspiration from the specificity and anti-nostalgic nature of rap music: “Rap music is specific and it's obsessed with dating itself and it's obsessed with referencing. It's like anti-nostalgic. And I think that is so potent for me.” Roberts' works often celebrate and critique modern life, reflecting personal insecurities and the complex interplay of consumer culture. This includes a fascination with finance and modern societal structures, incorporating these themes into his art with a critical yet appreciative lens. Charlie Roberts was born and raised in Kansas, United States. He graduated from Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design, Vancouver, Canada, in 2005. He is known for collecting and sampling elements from contemporary pop culture and hip-hop to art history in his praxis, which spans wood carving, ceramics, painting on canvas, and watercolor on paper. Roberts currently lives and works in Oslo, Norway. Christian Lund interviewed Charlie Roberts in Roberts’ studio in Oslo, Norway, in 2022. Camera: Rasmus Quistgaard Edited by: Nanna Rebekka Produced by: Christian Lund

02
MAFF Shop Icon

interviews

00:26

MAFF makes sustainable shopping accessible

We had a showroom sale on the streets of Orchard & Hester. PLASTIC IS THE COMMON ENEMY.

03

interviews

02:14

Aboudia

Ahead of a dedicated online sale, the acclaimed Ivorian artist discusses the ideas behind his distinctive work and its links to the African street children who find escape through graffiti. A painter and craftsman, the Cote d'Ivoire-born artist Aboudia speaks with us about his creative process (many of his works incorporate materials found in Abidjan and NYC) and the importance of including children in his art. ‘It’s possible to grow up on the street and become someone.' — Aboudia

04

interviews

46:43

Death of the Follower & the Future of Creativity with Jack Conte

Patreon CEO Jack Conte explains how the current internet algorithms are killing the traditional "follower" for creators, threatening their creative freedom and livelihoods. The internet started as a platform that democratized creative distribution. You could upload your work to platforms like YouTube and immediately have it accessible to millions of people. After that came the "subscribe" button, which enabled creators to go beyond reach. Now they could build a following and find their true fans that would support them to build a creative business. But with the rise of platform-focused algorithms (Facebook's ranking, TikTok's "for you" curation), creators cannot reach their following and true fans. This shift has had a devastating impact on creators' creativity and ability to support themselves doing what they love. He advocates for the new spaces on the internet (like Patreon) where creators can always connect with their communities, create what they want, and control their own destinies.

05
Original

interviews

01:17

Christelle Kocher of KOCHÉ | MAFF Artist Spotlight

KOCHÉ is a fashion brand established in Paris by Christelle Kocher in 2015. KOCHÉ is on a mission to push values of openness in fashion: diversity & inclusion of genders, body shapes, materials used, social and geographical origins.. moreover, KOCHÉ DNA is based on elevated craft know-how.

06
Original

interviews

00:34

MAFF chat — Nana Nyahan 🇬🇭

Ring rring it’s #MAFFchat featuring fam across the 🌍 Dialing in with #nananyahan based in Accra, Ghana. Using a myriad of contrasting colors and textures, Nana takes her viewers on a psychotropic journey drawing inspiration from her relationships, pain, sadness, and experiences of intimacy. Nyahan creates a utopian reality for both her and her viewers; an instant escape from the day to day noise.

07
Original

interviews

03:11

Domingo Colman | MAFF Tour Uruguay 🇺🇾

Helping a homeless dog lead us into discovering a hidden Uruguayan legend. 🇺🇾❤️‍🔥 We love you Blue. Producer @milagrosbrasco Not possible without: @arielmeilich Organic house queen @mai_berg Return of the dogs @aiam___maia @aguabrota @doctorawild bong @nathaquer shelter @juampi.boa for the jams @leapedranzini for printing Art @chiara.baccanelli @gustavojauge @made.uy art @facundo.diazz @flordepalleja @estudiodelespacio @milagrosbrasco @azulgattas @piligomensoro shelter Food & vibes @panaderiaji @rizoma.lajuanita @almacencasadealimentos @protectoradeanimalesmaldonado

08

interviews

13:53

Nicer Tuesdays: Ines Alpha

Joining us from Paris, Ines Alpha works with AR and 3D renders to reflect on our ever-increasing need to express ourselves. Here, she explains how she developed this unique practice, providing some insight into how she applies this to commercial projects for the likes of Selfridges, Charli XCX and Nike. Nicer Tuesdays is a monthly event curated by It’s Nice That bringing together a selection of speakers for short, sharp insights on new and timely projects.

09
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interviews

20:47

Canal Once: SAVE THE DOGS IN URUGUAY CREW

With the community recognizing local artists while saving homeless animals.

10

interviews

01:52

Pierre Huyghe on "Liminal", Punta della Dogana

“Magic is the science of signs. Signs are an interplay of symbols. In this respect yes I believe in symbols.” Pierre Huyghe is a French artist who works in a variety of media from films and sculptures to public interventions and living systems.

11

interviews

04:15

Vivian Suter

Vivian Suter was born in Buenos Aires in 1949. He has painted in Basel, Vienna, Africa, Bern, Rome and Panajachel and has lived in Panajachel, Guatemala since 1982. Panajachel Traveling through North and Central America in 1982, Vivian Suter arrived in Panajachel - a town on the shores of Lake Atitlán - and remained there, forming her home on land on an old coffee plantation. Since the beginning of the 80s, most of his artistic work has been created from this scenario, and many of his works have become part of it. The gravels, along with the aguacatales and mango trees, which were originally planted to protect the coffee plantations, provide the shade area throughout the year. A steep path, in which the bleachers are mixed with the sidewalk of the mountain, leads to the study of Vivian Suter, from which you can see above the tips of the trees, the town of Panajachel with its lake and its volcanoes. The art that is born here is about the wind, the volcanoes and the vastness and clarity of this tropical landscape. Under the shadow of the coffee plantation, there is a second study. The view between the gablets reaches only the leaves of the dense banana plants that grow in front of the house. This is where the foreground works are created: the recurring motif of the forbidden fruit, the look on oneself or fixed on the interior.

12
Original

interviews

03:13

Otay:Onii | MAFF Tour Shanghai (Episode 2)

"Lost is an illusion. Open your hands, you'll realize you have everything." Otay:onii (Lane Shi) is a multifaceted artist originally from Haining, China. Her artistic practice spans across music, sound design, installation art, and film composition. She is the lead vocalist and keyboardist of the punk spit band Elizabeth Colour Wheel (US). Lane's voice is like an ancient call, sometimes beckoning the soul, and at other times, piercing the listener like lightning. Lane came to the U.S. at a young age when she still needed parental accompaniment, living as an immigrant with a dual cultural background. This marginalized, non-mainstream existence makes her voice transcend cultures and languages. She wrote, "My task is to solve a puzzle with another puzzle that can't be seen, be touched, but to feel."

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interviews

The Definition of Good Design | Designer Naoto Fukasawa 深澤直人

Youtube

”To take the relation between people and things or the environment and shed light on it to find suitable and optimal solutions is my job.” Japanese design pioneer, Naoto Fukasawa, shares his work process, philosophies, and thoughts on good and bad design. Of course, Naoto Fukasawa drew as a child. But growing up with a father who was an electrician, he was also constantly surrounded by different tools that opened a world to create that went beyond drawings. When the time came to choose what to study, Fukasawa decided to become a product designer. “The first ten to fifteen years, I thought that the making of good forms or beautiful forms was my job,” he explains. “I was told that designs differ according to peoples’ taste. I don’t think so,” Fukasawa says and elaborates: “Instead of asking the opinion or sense of people, it’s better to be quiet and observe. I am sure that there are things that all people will like. I don’t know if you could call it universal. But I deliberately use this intuition and try to give it a form. To keep quiet and try to show is the essence of design.” Known for his minimalistic aesthetics, Fukasawa has designed products for several respected companies, including the iconic Japanese lifestyle store, MUJI. When talking about simplicity in design Naoto Fukasawa says: “Simple is not just a question of form, but also of harmony.” To him, the best-designed products needn’t necessarily be noticeable: “They just have to be there when you need them, without causing trouble. They show their love best by being quiet.” To achieve this in his design, Fukasawa uses the same method: “To observe people, their surroundings, space, and things have become a natural habit of mine.” “If a designer thinks about structure together with an engineer, it’s actually easier to do this ‘design thinking’.” An essential part of Naoto Fukasawa’s design process lies within his collaboration with skilled craftsmen and engineers: “As an industrial designer, the knowledge of the whole industrial production process from design to the factory is very important,” he says and continues: “Design is to have the power to feel and understand what everybody will like. And make sure this is understood by the craftsmen or the engineers. It’s not just something you should feel. The designer should also know precisely how to realize it.” Naoto Fukasawa (b. 1956) is a Japanese industrial designer, author, and educator, working in product and furniture design. He is known for his product design work with the Japanese retail company MUJI, as well as work with and for companies such as Herman Miller, Alessi, B&B Italia, Magis, and HAY. In 2003 Naoto Fuksawa started working independently after several years for Seiko Epson and IDEO San Francisco. His designs span a variety of fields, from precision electronic equipment to furniture, interior spaces, and architecture. Fukasawa determined that the impetus for design is found in people’s unconscious behavior and named this “Without Thought.” Naoto Fukasawa has been working on the advisory board of Muji and is on the judging panel of the Nikkei Shimbun’s Superior Products and Services Award. He was the Good Design Award chairman from 2010 to 2014. He has also judged on the Braun Prize in 2012. In 2018 he was awarded the Isamu Noguchi Award. Naoto Fukasawa was interviewed in his studio in Tokyo, Japan, by journalist Jens H. Jensen in April 2022.

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